Cooking Caveman with Jeff Nimoy

THESE ARE THE COOKING ADVENTURES OF JEFF NIMOY, AN LA WRITER WHO, WHILE DOING RESEARCH FOR A SCRIPT, STUMBLED UPON WHAT’S CALLED THE CAVEMAN DIET, ALSO KNOWN AS THE PALEO DIET. BASICALLY, IT’S EATING WHAT THE CAVEMEN ATE. HE TRIED IT OUT, AND THE RESULTS HAVE BEEN STAGGERING! THIS BLOG SHOWS EXACTLY HOW AND WHAT JEFF EATS. IF YOU’RE NEW TO THE BLOG, PLEASE START WITH THE “ENTERING THE CAVE” PAGE TO GET A CLEAR UNDERSTANDING OF WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT.

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Anonymous asked: I LOVE your new videos. If you can bang out more of them, that would be awesome!

Thanks, I appreciate it! More to come soon.

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Just a raw video series, very little production.  Let’s call it Caveman Unplugged.  Showing some of my favorite meals.  Not the usual fully produced cooking videos I’ve done in the past, but I can make these videos much faster.  Let me know how you like them.

First up, a fan favorite, Paleo Ramen Soup!

(Click HERE for recipe)

Filed under paleo ramen soup ramen ramen soup paleo caveman caveman diet shrimp daikon noodles

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Paleo Bratwurst!  From the Wisconsin farm I told you about, Uncured Natural Meats.  These 100% grass-fed beef brats are made from filtered water, Himalayan sea salt (only 1%), organic spices, and stuffed into sheep casings.  That’s about as paleo as you can get for meat in a tube.  This is why Uncured Natural Meats is the only place I found so far that meets the anal strict paleo standards of the Cooking Caveman!  They are my go to place for hot dogs (they call them wieners), salami (they call it Summer Sausage), and now brats.  The next thing I want to try is their all beef breakfast sausage.  They also have beef bacon, but the ingredients lists sugar as an ingredient, and I want to avoid that on the paleo diet.
Speaking of breakfast sausage, bratwurst has always tasted like a savory breakfast sausage to me, so I’m interested to see the difference in taste when my next shipment arrives.  But first, let’s talk about this bratwurst.  Traditionally in Wisconsin, brats are boiled in beer, with onions, and then finished on the grill.  But I just pan fried these in a cast iron skillet until brown.  For the bun, I used a slice of my almond butter bread (without a doubt, the most popular recipe I ever posted), and I served it with organic mustard, my Caveman Ketchup (I never eat ketchup on my hot dog, but love it with bratwurst), sautéed red onions and sauerkraut (in the same skillet), plus some crushed red pepper chili flakes to add a little heat.
You can definitely taste the quality!  It’s much thinner than an average brat, but also much meatier.  I loved it, and will be ordering more for sure.  But I want to taste their breakfast sausage first, because if they taste similar to me, I’ll just go with the one I like best at that point.  I used to love breakfast sausage links before I went Caveman, and now I can have them again, dipping them into the runny yolk of a pasture-raised egg.  Ugga-Bugga!

These are the kinds of companies we should be supporting with our financial patronage.  They are small, family run, and have such high quality and standards in their products, that it’s worth a little extra money, even for the costs of shipping (which they lose money on by the way).  It is an extremely clean way of eating some of our particular favorite foods (I LOVE cured meats), that are normally made in an extremely unhealthy way.  So please, go out to eat one time less a month, and instead, buy some great uncured natural meat from this amazing company in Wisconsin, and support the paleo movement!  They are not a paleo company per se (nor do they compensate me to be a spokesman), but their meats definitely cater to the paleo community.  Visit them today!

Paleo Bratwurst!  From the Wisconsin farm I told you about, Uncured Natural Meats.  These 100% grass-fed beef brats are made from filtered water, Himalayan sea salt (only 1%), organic spices, and stuffed into sheep casings.  That’s about as paleo as you can get for meat in a tube.  This is why Uncured Natural Meats is the only place I found so far that meets the anal strict paleo standards of the Cooking Caveman!  They are my go to place for hot dogs (they call them wieners), salami (they call it Summer Sausage), and now brats.  The next thing I want to try is their all beef breakfast sausage.  They also have beef bacon, but the ingredients lists sugar as an ingredient, and I want to avoid that on the paleo diet.

Speaking of breakfast sausage, bratwurst has always tasted like a savory breakfast sausage to me, so I’m interested to see the difference in taste when my next shipment arrives.  But first, let’s talk about this bratwurst.  Traditionally in Wisconsin, brats are boiled in beer, with onions, and then finished on the grill.  But I just pan fried these in a cast iron skillet until brown.  For the bun, I used a slice of my almond butter bread (without a doubt, the most popular recipe I ever posted), and I served it with organic mustard, my Caveman Ketchup (I never eat ketchup on my hot dog, but love it with bratwurst), sautéed red onions and sauerkraut (in the same skillet), plus some crushed red pepper chili flakes to add a little heat.

You can definitely taste the quality!  It’s much thinner than an average brat, but also much meatier.  I loved it, and will be ordering more for sure.  But I want to taste their breakfast sausage first, because if they taste similar to me, I’ll just go with the one I like best at that point.  I used to love breakfast sausage links before I went Caveman, and now I can have them again, dipping them into the runny yolk of a pasture-raised egg.  Ugga-Bugga!

These are the kinds of companies we should be supporting with our financial patronage.  They are small, family run, and have such high quality and standards in their products, that it’s worth a little extra money, even for the costs of shipping (which they lose money on by the way).  It is an extremely clean way of eating some of our particular favorite foods (I LOVE cured meats), that are normally made in an extremely unhealthy way.  So please, go out to eat one time less a month, and instead, buy some great uncured natural meat from this amazing company in Wisconsin, and support the paleo movement!  They are not a paleo company per se (nor do they compensate me to be a spokesman), but their meats definitely cater to the paleo community.  Visit them today!

Filed under Uncured Natural Meats paleo organic caveman caveman diet brats bratwurst

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Happy Sunday Morning Breakfast. Pasture-raised eggs, grass-fed beef bratwurst, and almond butter bread toast. Blog about the brats coming soon.

Happy Sunday Morning Breakfast. Pasture-raised eggs, grass-fed beef bratwurst, and almond butter bread toast. Blog about the brats coming soon.

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Breakfast for Dinner last night, Salami and Eggs, just like my grandfather used to make for me.  I cooked the grass-fed beef salami well done before adding the pasture-raised eggs, YUM!  Served it with a little organic brown mustard.
This salami is about as paleo as salami can get, from the Wisconsin farm I told you about, Uncured Natural Meats.  I just ordered a bunch more stuff from them to stock up my freezer, and save on shipping.  Included in the grass-fed goodies are ground beef (the wonderful owner there, Debra, told me that when you buy a package of their ground beef, it all comes from one cow!  I don’t know of any other farmer or butcher that can guarantee that.  I can’t wait to taste it!), my first beef heart (I’m gonna cook it like a roast beef), and some all beef brats (I can’t shop at a place in Wisconsin and not taste their brats, right?!).  I’m gonna have the beef brats for dinner tonight, so I’ll tell you how that goes soon.  In the mid ‘90’s I used to visit Wisconsin quite a bit, and I used to love State Street Brats in Madison, and The Brat Stop (I think in Racine).
By the way, they also have salmon, and even though I’m not a huge fan of cooked fish, I read they fish theirs from the cleanest waters in Alaska.  You can’t get more paleo than that.  Check them out!

Breakfast for Dinner last night, Salami and Eggs, just like my grandfather used to make for me.  I cooked the grass-fed beef salami well done before adding the pasture-raised eggs, YUM!  Served it with a little organic brown mustard.

This salami is about as paleo as salami can get, from the Wisconsin farm I told you about, Uncured Natural Meats.  I just ordered a bunch more stuff from them to stock up my freezer, and save on shipping.  Included in the grass-fed goodies are ground beef (the wonderful owner there, Debra, told me that when you buy a package of their ground beef, it all comes from one cow!  I don’t know of any other farmer or butcher that can guarantee that.  I can’t wait to taste it!), my first beef heart (I’m gonna cook it like a roast beef), and some all beef brats (I can’t shop at a place in Wisconsin and not taste their brats, right?!).  I’m gonna have the beef brats for dinner tonight, so I’ll tell you how that goes soon.  In the mid ‘90’s I used to visit Wisconsin quite a bit, and I used to love State Street Brats in Madison, and The Brat Stop (I think in Racine).

By the way, they also have salmon, and even though I’m not a huge fan of cooked fish, I read they fish theirs from the cleanest waters in Alaska.  You can’t get more paleo than that.  Check them out!

Filed under salami paleo salami salami and eggs pasture raised eggs pasture-raised eggs grass fed grass fed beef grass-fed grass-fed beef brats bratwurst paleo caveman caveman diet organic crossfit

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It’s Paleo Shake ‘N Bake, and I helped!

Older cave-holes like me will remember the commercial for Shake ‘N Bake that I’m referencing in the title of this post.  I used to love that sodium laced shit.  I’d beg my grandmother to use it on our Friday night chicken as an occasional switch from her regular chicken seasoning of garlic powder, salt, and paprika.  Every once in a while, maybe two or three times a year, she used it, and I was in heaven!  I don’t know why, but shaking food in a bag to coat it is fun!  When I got older and started cooking for myself, pork chops in Shake ‘N Bake was one of the few things I could cook.  That’s right folks, the ol’ Caveman wasn’t the gourmet he is today.  The need for cooking on paleo has turned me into a good cook.  Since the day I decided to go paleo, the biggest obstacle was overcoming my fear of the kitchen.  My knife skills still suck, but the food tastes gooooooood!!!!  So four years into my paleo journey, recreating Shake ‘N Bake is something that comes relatively easy for me.  Not as easy as using Shake ‘N Bake itself, but still pretty easy.

So here are the main ingredients for real Shake ‘N Bake for pork chops:

enriched wheat flour
salt
partially dehydrated soybean and cottonseed oil
sugar
(less than 2% of the following)
paprika
dextrose
dried onions
spice (whatever the hell that means)
caramel color (Mmm, yum, color!)
yeast
food coloring
natural flavoring

Read labels, folks.  According to the government, you can call practically anything “natural” simply because it exists in nature.  Natural flavoring is usually nothing more than chemicals, imported from New Jersey.  Dextrose, or anything -ose, is usually sugar.  So they use sugar, and sugar as two ingredients.  No sugar on the caveman diet, folks.  One of the worst things you can put in your body.  That includes the raw organic honey I use from time to time, as well as any other fake paleo sugar, like coconut sugar, agave, maple, etc.  It’s all just sugar, so stop looking for approval to use it in your meals from the paleo police.  If you want though, by all means, use it, just understand that it’s a cheat ingredient.

And if you want to know my thoughts on salt, just go to my page and search for salt (or click HERE, you lazy bastards).  I’m tired of talking about salt, so read about it yourself.  All I recommend is, if you DO eat salt, use an organic salt, like sea salt, that doesn’t require major chemicals in its production, like most conventional table salts.

As far as “coloring” goes, I just used spices that mimic the color of Shake ‘N Bake.

My paleo Shake ‘N Bake has the following ingredients (and they’re all organic, all the time):

almond flour (from sprouted almonds if possible)
arrowroot
paprika
sage
onion powder
black pepper
garlic powder
cayenne pepper
parsley
turmeric

And this is how it turned out:

image

Ugga-Bugga!  Served it with some lemon broccoli rice.  Delicious.  The cooking instructions remained the same as on the box:

"Directions: Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Moisten with water 6 to 8 (1/2-inch thick) bone-in or boneless pork chops.

1. Shake moistened chops, 1 to 2 at a time, in shaker bag with one packet of coating mix. Discard any remaining mix and bag.

2. Bake at 425 degrees F in ungreased or foil-lined 15 x 10 x 1-inch baking pan until cooked through.

1/2-inch thick bone-in or boneless: 15 minutes. Do not cover or turn pork during baking. Bake thicker chops 5 to 10 minutes longer.”

My pasture-raised boneless chops were thicker (like 1 inch!), so I baked them longer.  The trick is to not go so much by 50 year old cooking instructions on a box, but go by meat temperature.  The old days of pork cooked to 140 degrees or more are gone!  Cook them to 130 degrees and they’ll be juicy and tender.  It’s a trick my buddy Jonathan taught me, when I made a pork loin back in 2010.

My Paleo Shake ‘N Bake Pork Chops were so good, I had 2!!!!!  That’s a little more meat than I’m normally comfortable eating in one sitting, but I couldn’t stop myself.  I thought, “I’ll just have one bite of a second chop…” and before I knew it, GONE!  Maybe I’ll try this cooking method with chicken in the future, or just mix up the spice blend from time to time according to my mood.  Give it a try yourselves and let me know how it comes out!

Filed under paleo caveman caveman diet All Ingredients All Organic All the Time organic pork chops shake 'n bake paleo shake 'n bake ugga-bugga pasture raised pasture-raised pasture raised pork pasture-raised pork

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mrbbm1 asked: Can you tell me how long garlic cloves last for? Got some last weekend. Used a few and have some left. Or is there anything I can do to make them last longer? Thank you.

I usually leave garlic in the bulb, and break off cloves as I need them.  I keep them in the crisper draw, along with my onions, and they all seemingly last forever.  They last longer than I use them up anyway.  Every now and then a portion of an onion will be a little rotten, but I just cut around it when that happens.  Once I cut an onion, I wrap the leftovers in paper towel and then put it in one of those Debbie Meyer Green Bags (see the link for more info on these great bags that make fresh produce last for weeks instead of days).

The only time garlic ever went bad on me is when I bought a few cloves that have already been peeled.  They only lasted a few days, but I bet in a Green Bag they would last longer.  My advice is don’t peel them until you need them, keep them unwrapped in the crisper draw of your fridge, and it should last you a long long time.

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Tropical Chili!  Totally paleo, and totally delicious.  I discovered this dish by accident, combining leftovers one night, and coming up with something new and fantastic, which will be in my meal rotation from now on.  The first time I made it, I used ground beef, but this time I used leftover brisket, and it was just as good.  I’m sure pork would be great too.  It’s sweet and spicy!  The star of the dish is my Plum Loco Sauce, which just goes to show you, it would even make a shoe taste good.  I’m all out of the batches of Plum Loco Sauce I froze at the end of last summer, so I’ll have to wait until plums are in season again to make more!
Tropical Chili (all ingredients, all organic, all the time)
beef or pork (if you want to go vegetarian, skip the meat and use more broccoli rice)jalapeñoscallionsgarlicgingerolive oilceleryparsleycilantroPlum Loco Sauce2 spoonfuls of coconut butterbroccoli ricelemon juicelime juicepineapple and/or mangoavocado
Top with avocado, fresh scallions, and fresh cilantro.

Tropical Chili!  Totally paleo, and totally delicious.  I discovered this dish by accident, combining leftovers one night, and coming up with something new and fantastic, which will be in my meal rotation from now on.  The first time I made it, I used ground beef, but this time I used leftover brisket, and it was just as good.  I’m sure pork would be great too.  It’s sweet and spicy!  The star of the dish is my Plum Loco Sauce, which just goes to show you, it would even make a shoe taste good.  I’m all out of the batches of Plum Loco Sauce I froze at the end of last summer, so I’ll have to wait until plums are in season again to make more!

Tropical Chili (all ingredients, all organic, all the time)

beef or pork (if you want to go vegetarian, skip the meat and use more broccoli rice)
jalapeño
scallions
garlic
ginger
olive oil
celery
parsley
cilantro
Plum Loco Sauce
2 spoonfuls of coconut butter
broccoli rice
lemon juice
lime juice
pineapple and/or mango
avocado

Top with avocado, fresh scallions, and fresh cilantro.

Filed under chili tropical chili paleo All Ingredients All Organic All the Time caveman caveman diet crossfit broccoli rice plum loco plum loco sauce organic

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Paleo Corned Beef and Cabbage.  Happy St. Patty’s Day!  I bought a grass-fed corned beef (it was freaking expensive, but I wanted to try it).  It was brined in organic spices and Himalayan pink salt (not a fan of considering salt of any kind paleo, but you need it to brine, so it makes this only a minor mini-cheat).  Organic cabbage and organic rutabaga (instead of the traditional potatoes) accompany the meal.
I better bake a loaf of paleo bread, so I can have leftover sandwiches! 

Paleo Corned Beef and Cabbage.  Happy St. Patty’s Day!  I bought a grass-fed corned beef (it was freaking expensive, but I wanted to try it).  It was brined in organic spices and Himalayan pink salt (not a fan of considering salt of any kind paleo, but you need it to brine, so it makes this only a minor mini-cheat).  Organic cabbage and organic rutabaga (instead of the traditional potatoes) accompany the meal.

I better bake a loaf of paleo bread, so I can have leftover sandwiches! 

Filed under grass fed grass-fed paleo caveman caveman diet Corned Beef paleo corned beef and cabbage corned beef and cabbage

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Chicken and Red Cabbage.  First, I coated the dry chicken legs on both sides with black pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, and oregano, and browned it (on both sides) with olive oil in a dutch oven.
Then I removed the chicken from the dutch oven, and deglazed the pan with more olive oil, shredded red cabbage, onions, garlic, diced apples, cayenne pepper, and finally lemon and lime juice.  Once the bottom of the pan was deglazed, I placed the browned chicken legs back on top of the red cabbage mixture, covered the dutch oven, and put it in a 350 degree oven for an hour.  The skin stayed crispy and the chicken was fall off the bone tender.  The best of both worlds!  Ugga-Bugga!  This would work great in a crockpot too.

Chicken and Red Cabbage.  First, I coated the dry chicken legs on both sides with black pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, and oregano, and browned it (on both sides) with olive oil in a dutch oven.

Then I removed the chicken from the dutch oven, and deglazed the pan with more olive oil, shredded red cabbage, onions, garlic, diced apples, cayenne pepper, and finally lemon and lime juice.  Once the bottom of the pan was deglazed, I placed the browned chicken legs back on top of the red cabbage mixture, covered the dutch oven, and put it in a 350 degree oven for an hour.  The skin stayed crispy and the chicken was fall off the bone tender.  The best of both worlds!  Ugga-Bugga!  This would work great in a crockpot too.

Filed under dutch oven chicken crockpot chicken red cabbage

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Anonymous asked: Dear Jeff! I am just wondering how your body does work on paleo lifestlye. So I've really craving tonnes of food on and off. As I am not aiming to be killer strict I have one treat yummy feast once a week. Do you experience the same things/increased appetite? Like not on a daily basis but occassionally.If so, what are your experiences on this topic? Thanks for replying!

I also enjoy a cheat meal once a week, so maybe I’m not as strict as you think. As far as an increased appetite goes, one meal usually does it for me per day (usually a big dinner), but sometimes I just eat more out if boredom, or stress, or weakness because the food is in front of me and available. But on paleo, one large meal of clean eating usually curbs my appetite for 24 hours. But the simplest way to put it is, if I’m hungry, I eat. I won’t deny myself just stay on my fasting schedule. An egg, or a handful of almonds, or a small salad, plus lots of water usually tides me over nicely until dinner. Thanks for writing!

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Tuna Salad Stuffed Avocado.  Usually I like to put tomato in my tuna salad, but I didn’t have any (would’ve been nice to add some color to this very green dish).  Instead I have cucumber, celery, parsley, capers, scallions, homemade mayo, lemon juice, and spices like black pepper, oregano, cumin, crushed chili flakes, and garlic powder.

Tuna Salad Stuffed Avocado.  Usually I like to put tomato in my tuna salad, but I didn’t have any (would’ve been nice to add some color to this very green dish).  Instead I have cucumber, celery, parsley, capers, scallions, homemade mayo, lemon juice, and spices like black pepper, oregano, cumin, crushed chili flakes, and garlic powder.

Filed under tuna tuna salad tuna stuffed avocado avocado Mayonaise mayo mayonnaise homemade paleo caveman caveman diet organic crossfit