Cooking Caveman with Jeff Nimoy

THESE ARE THE COOKING ADVENTURES OF JEFF NIMOY, AN LA WRITER WHO, WHILE DOING RESEARCH FOR A SCRIPT, STUMBLED UPON WHAT’S CALLED THE CAVEMAN DIET, ALSO KNOWN AS THE PALEO DIET. BASICALLY, IT’S EATING WHAT THE CAVEMEN ATE. HE TRIED IT OUT, AND THE RESULTS HAVE BEEN STAGGERING! THIS BLOG SHOWS EXACTLY HOW AND WHAT JEFF EATS. IF YOU’RE NEW TO THE BLOG, PLEASE START WITH THE “ENTERING THE CAVE” PAGE TO GET A CLEAR UNDERSTANDING OF WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT.

14 notes

Mexican Beef Stir Fry over Broccoli Rice.
I’m trying to eat more organ meat because it’s really good for you, but I’m just not thrilled with the taste. But I find when it’s ground, and mixed with ground beef (all grass-fed from Uncured Natural Meats in Wisconsin), it’s very tasty. This is a blend of ground beef, ground tongue, ground heart, and ground liver.
ground grass-fed beef (including ground organ meat)onionsgarlicred and green jalapeñoscilantroblack peppercuminoreganolime juicelemon juice
broccoli (rice)

Mexican Beef Stir Fry over Broccoli Rice.

I’m trying to eat more organ meat because it’s really good for you, but I’m just not thrilled with the taste. But I find when it’s ground, and mixed with ground beef (all grass-fed from Uncured Natural Meats in Wisconsin), it’s very tasty. This is a blend of ground beef, ground tongue, ground heart, and ground liver.

ground grass-fed beef (including ground organ meat)
onions
garlic
red and green jalapeños
cilantro
black pepper
cumin
oregano
lime juice
lemon juice

broccoli (rice)

Filed under mexican stir fry grass-fed grass fed paleo organic organ meat caveman broccoli rice

3 notes

Paleo Potato Salad (made with Rutabaga)
I’m one of those paleo followers that don’t eat potatoes (white, sweet, red, etc), but I LOVE potato salad, especially in the summer time. My July 4th BBQ plate definitely felt empty without it, so I used my best potato substitute, rutabaga (a root vegetable that tastes like a cross between a potato and a turnip), and just made a simple classic potato salad recipe. It came out great! Pretty addictive if you ask me!
Paleo Potato Salad (because Rutabaga Salad doesn’t sound as appetizing)
rutabagascallionsdillmayonnaiseblack peppergarlic powderparsley
Dice the rutabaga into bite-sized pieces, and place in a pot with cold water. Bring the water to a boil, and boil for about 10 minutes. Start testing it with a fork to see if the rutabaga is tender. Keep testing every minute or so for desired tenderness. Once done, drain rutabaga in a colander, and refrigerate. After it’s cool, mix all ingredients together and enjoy! If you want, add hard boiled egg too!

Paleo Potato Salad (made with Rutabaga)

I’m one of those paleo followers that don’t eat potatoes (white, sweet, red, etc), but I LOVE potato salad, especially in the summer time. My July 4th BBQ plate definitely felt empty without it, so I used my best potato substitute, rutabaga (a root vegetable that tastes like a cross between a potato and a turnip), and just made a simple classic potato salad recipe. It came out great! Pretty addictive if you ask me!

Paleo Potato Salad (because Rutabaga Salad doesn’t sound as appetizing)

rutabaga
scallions
dill
mayonnaise
black pepper
garlic powder
parsley

Dice the rutabaga into bite-sized pieces, and place in a pot with cold water. Bring the water to a boil, and boil for about 10 minutes. Start testing it with a fork to see if the rutabaga is tender. Keep testing every minute or so for desired tenderness. Once done, drain rutabaga in a colander, and refrigerate. After it’s cool, mix all ingredients together and enjoy! If you want, add hard boiled egg too!

Filed under paleo potato salad rutabaga salad rutabaga organic paleo

3 notes

Anonymous asked: Have you ever used or heard of Great Lakes Collagen? There's 2 types- one that doesn't congeal and can be added to soups/coffee/tea/sauces, and the other does and is good for making homemade gummies. Some bloggers say we not only ate the meat but the bones too, and doing so is good for our bones/skin/hair/nails and digestion.

Yes, I bought some of the congealing type to try to make my paleo chocolate pudding a little more pudding like, but it just made it gummy, which is a consistency I’m not fond of. I’ve also added it to soups and such as a thickener, but I’m always looking for recipes to add collagen to my diet.

I’m a huge proponent of collagen and its health benefits, as I wrote back in 2012, when I made my first bone broth soup. When wild animals kill they eat the organs and bones way quicker than they do the fleshy meat that humans find so delectable, which is a huge indicator where all the nutrition is when eating an animal.

Here’s a great NY Times article detailing the benefits of bone broth and collagen.

1 note

In response to my comment in the last post that I’ve never seen a paleo bacon on the market that meets my anal, um, I mean, high standards, reader megjersey asks if I ever tried Pete’s Paleo Bacon, which I have not heard of until she mentioned it. But after looking it up, it looks pretty paleo to me, so if you’re a bacon nut and don’t mind the salt, go for it and let me know how you like it!
Personally, I’ve never been a bacon fanatic anyway. I’ve liked it, but mostly as bacon, and not as an ingredient in other dishes. It’s even rare that I crave bacon on my burger. But I have enjoyed it my whole life, mostly as a side dish to eggs and especially pancakes in my pre-Caveman days (B.C. as in before caveman). To me the best thing about bacon is the smell when it’s cooking, and my sense memory of waking to it on a Sunday morning (along with the smell of coffee) makes me feel all warm and fuzzy inside. Like soiling myself without the cleanup.
I might buy some Pete’s Paleo Bacon, and have it every now and then as a treat, but truthfully, bacon has been easy for me to give up since going paleo, and since I also don’t eat much salt, whenever I do have it on a cheat day, I find it far too salty to eat!

In response to my comment in the last post that I’ve never seen a paleo bacon on the market that meets my anal, um, I mean, high standards, reader megjersey asks if I ever tried Pete’s Paleo Bacon, which I have not heard of until she mentioned it. But after looking it up, it looks pretty paleo to me, so if you’re a bacon nut and don’t mind the salt, go for it and let me know how you like it!

Personally, I’ve never been a bacon fanatic anyway. I’ve liked it, but mostly as bacon, and not as an ingredient in other dishes. It’s even rare that I crave bacon on my burger. But I have enjoyed it my whole life, mostly as a side dish to eggs and especially pancakes in my pre-Caveman days (B.C. as in before caveman). To me the best thing about bacon is the smell when it’s cooking, and my sense memory of waking to it on a Sunday morning (along with the smell of coffee) makes me feel all warm and fuzzy inside. Like soiling myself without the cleanup.

I might buy some Pete’s Paleo Bacon, and have it every now and then as a treat, but truthfully, bacon has been easy for me to give up since going paleo, and since I also don’t eat much salt, whenever I do have it on a cheat day, I find it far too salty to eat!

Filed under pete's paleo bacon

12 notes

scotchsexgoodstuff asked: Hello Mr Nimoy, I hope life is finding you well. So, I am a scrawny 5'6 (5'7 if i stand up straight) 125 lb scrawny guy who is quickly becoming fat. yay jiggly rolls.... I am definitely leaning towards paleo and a gym. But I have friends who are "paleo" but they all seem to cheat and don't quite to follow what i'be been scouering the interwebs and finding. What would your advice be for the top 5 things to stay away from? Thank you! I love the blog.

Yes, there are a lot of people who say they eat paleo but in actuality their diets are closer to Atkins than anything. I don’t care how many clever slogans I see, no one will ever convince me that bacon is health food. Unless it’s from a pasture-raised pig, made with natural salt (and not much of it), and no sugar. But I haven’t seen that product on the market yet (NOTE: Reader megjersey asks if I ever tried Pete’s Paleo Bacon, which I have not heard of until she mentioned it, and after looking it up, it looks pretty paleo to me, so if you’re a bacon nut and don’t mind the salt, go for it and let me know how you like it).

Okay, I know you asked for 5, but here are the top 8 things that I stay away from as much as possible (based on my original article “7 NO’s and a YES), and they are in no particular order. Someone else’s list might be different, but I can only speak for myself. For instance, a long distance runner who follows paleo might have a completely different list, but these are the things that a lazy bastard like me stays away from.

1- Grains. All grains. Wheat, barley, corn, rice, oats, etc. Some are worse for you than others (in other words, more toxic), but I stay away from them all. Rice and quinoa (which is actually a seed) are more neutral in their toxicity, but are still empty carbs without adding much nutrition. I don’t feel the protein in quinoa is worth eating it for the added empty carbs.

2- Processed food. Unless ALL the ingredients on the label are paleo, stay away from it. I stop reading the label after one chemical sounding ingredient like sodium benzoid, or some crap like that.

3 - Non-Organic food. I would rather you eat organic grains than non-organic meat. There are so many bad things for you (mostly chemical) in non-organic food that it makes me sad. This includes avoiding non-pasture raised meat and eggs as much as possible. Yes, I know organic food is more expensive, but if you’re not buying that bag of snack food, and making your own things like bread and mayo, than it’s more affordable than you might think. Here’s an article I wrote proving that organic paleo is affordable for all.

4 - Conventional Table Salt. Stripped away at the salt mines by all kinds of nasty chemicals. IF you are going to add salt to your food (which I highly recommend you don’t), I’d rather you use organic sea salt or Himalayan salt, or something similar, but once it’s in your system, salt is salt as far as your body is concerned. There is enough salt in the organic food we eat to keep us alive without adding anything extra. Your tastebuds will become much more sensitive (a good thing) after giving up salt, and your body will become much healthier. Again, if you work out constantly, you might decide you need more salt in your diet, but my 3 reps a day of getting off the couch doesn’t see a need for it.

5 - Sugar. One of the worst things for us, if not THE worst. The only two forms of sugar I eat are raw organic honey, and fruit, but again, remember, once it enters your system, sugar is sugar, and it’s not good for you. At least fruit offers fiber and nutrition. Keep the fruit in moderation, eat the honey as a once in a while treat, and I think it’s a nice balance for a healthy diet.

6 - Legumes. This one sometimes breaks my rule of “if you can’t eat it raw, don’t cook with it,” because there are some legumes you can definitely eat raw, like snow peas, and green beans. But for the most part, you can’t eat most legumes raw, and you can only cook out so many of the toxins. The trace amounts of toxins left over build up over the years, and eventually lead to disease. The same goes for grains. The big ones to stay away from are beans (especially soy), and peanuts, but I stay away from them all, even the edible when raw ones. Still, one meal of green beans won’t kill you (but 10,000 meals of them might).

7 - Potatoes. As far as I know, you cannot eat a potato raw, without the chance of getting sick. Not only that, a cooked potato turns to sugar when digested. But still, there are worse things in life for you than an organic potato, so if someone orders a plate of fries and you have a few, don’t beat yourself up. But if you gave up salt, you might find them too salty to eat! That’s a good thing, not bad. By the way, this goes for sweet potatoes for me too (don’t write me nasty comments, if you eat sweet potatoes, good for you, but I don’t, for the same reasons I don’t eat white potatoes).

8 - Dairy. I rarely eat diary, unless it’s from a pasture-raised animal (go primals!). I just can’t justify it being part of a natural diet for humans, in the time before cultivation. But if you’re not lactose intolerant, and you want to eat pasture-raised dairy, a little moderation can go a long way to living a healthy life.

Dairy, meat, eggs, and sugar are acidic on the body, and most plant based food has an alkaline effect on the body. You want a ratio of about 70% alkaline to 30% acid for a healthy balance. So if your plate is 70% meat and 30% veggies… switch! You want mostly veggies, and a little (or no) animal based food in your overall diet to maintain a healthy balance.

I hope this helps, and thanks for reading! Good luck!

4 notes

bite: a pop-up restaurant series

Chef Jessica Baker, of tumblr and SamePlate.com fame, is raising money for a new series of pop-up restaurants, called BITE. Check it out!

5 notes

girly-geek-138 asked: Quinoa. Grain, or legume? Is it even paleo? I've been cooking with it for a while but realized I know next to nothing about it.

According to Mark Sisson of Mark’s Daily Apple, quinoa is a seed. But I don’t eat it because it doesn’t match my paleo rules. If you can’t eat it raw, I don’t cook with it. And you have to soak and sprout quinoa if you want to eat it raw, which means I can’t pick it from the ground and eat it. Besides, it has a lot of empty carbs, much like rice. People casually think that because it has so much protein it’s paleo, but like you, they know very little about it. By the way, we don’t need as much protein to live as people think, in fact, you can get all your protein from green leafy plants if you wanted to.

I prefer to use cauliflower rice, or broccoli rice instead of things like quinoa, couscous, or rice.

7 notes

Anonymous asked: Know any good paleo oatless oatmeal- one without coconut (I get the runs) and nut butters (allergic)?

That’s a tough one without nuts and/or coconut. Is it all coconut products and nuts in general, or just coconut flesh and nut butter? Because everything I’ve seen has some nut and/or coconut milk, etc. Here’s the one I shared with my readers from the now defunct killfatme blog:

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts or pecans
  • 3 TB ground flaxseed (adds some texture too)
  • 2 tsp ground cinnamon 
  • 2 bananas, mashed 
  • 4 whole eggs
  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract

Directions:

  • Beat the eggs 
  • Whisk the coconut milk into the egg mixture
  • Mix in the chopped nuts, ground flax, banana mash, vanilla extract, and cinnamon
  • In a saucepan, warm the mixture on the stove over medium heat
  • Stir frequently to mix up any remaining lumps, and keep stirring until the “oatmeal” reaches the desired consistency (mine took about 5 mins)
  • Serve with berries, or whatever else you want to add to your oatless oatmeal!

To replace the coconut maybe use mashed pumpkin, butternut squash, or something similar in texture? To replace the nuts, just omit the nuts. Maybe add pumpkin seeds? You can replace the coconut milk with straight water, or almond milk if you’re not allergic. But my best advice is to Google search PALEO OATMEAL and see what you find. Good luck!

35 notes

This is a great little summer meal. Some boneless skinless chicken thighs (organic, but not pasture-raised), covered in a Mexican dry spice rub, and grilled or pan-fried (about 5 minutes each side on medium high heat). Served with a cold cucumber noodle salad with some Mexican flare!
Mexican Dry Spice Rubcumingarlic powderonion powdercorianderblack pepperoreganoparsley
Mexican Cucumber Noodle Saladspiralized cucumberdiced tomatoesdiced avocadoscallionschopped garliccilantroserrano pepperlime juice

This is a great little summer meal. Some boneless skinless chicken thighs (organic, but not pasture-raised), covered in a Mexican dry spice rub, and grilled or pan-fried (about 5 minutes each side on medium high heat). Served with a cold cucumber noodle salad with some Mexican flare!

Mexican Dry Spice Rub
cumin
garlic powder
onion powder
coriander
black pepper
oregano
parsley

Mexican Cucumber Noodle Salad
spiralized cucumber
diced tomatoes
diced avocado
scallions
chopped garlic
cilantro
serrano pepper
lime juice

Filed under cucumber noodles mexican cucumber noodle salad mexican dry spice rub mexican spice rub cold noodle salad paleo caveman organic

6 notes

Anonymous asked: got the mayo…amazing I might add. I copied part of the ketchup but didn't get it all. Can't seem to find it in recipes. Thanks. Beginning this experience and love your site! You are making it seem as if I can really do this! Hoping that my joint pain, lethargy and thickness around my middle will be a part of my past…thanks for the help

Congrats on making the decision to go paleo, and good luck, I’m glad I could help! Cutting out salt (even natural organic salt) will go a long way in helping your joint pain too! It takes a few days for your taste buds to come back (a few bland meals for sure), but once they do, everything will taste amazing!

Here’s a LINK to my ketchup video.

And if you can’t find something on my RECIPES PAGE, just do a simple search on my home page for KETCHUP, or whatever you’re looking for, and you’ll find it sooner or later.

Good luck!

25 notes

I’ve been totally into cold cucumber salads for dinner this summer (all 9 days of it so far). I just sort of see what leftovers and items I have in the fridge and then try to compose a tasty dish (like Paleo Chopped with no time limits and no judges).
This was like a cold Thai Cucumber Salad, and it was freaking delicious!
cucumber noodlesscallionssliced sausage (in this case it was grass-fed beef bratwurst)fresh gingerfresh garlicserrano pepperfresh cilantrofresh basilcoconut aminos
I’m thrilled to announce that so far this year’s crop of serrano peppers are hot and spicy, unlike my first crop from last summer.

I’ve been totally into cold cucumber salads for dinner this summer (all 9 days of it so far). I just sort of see what leftovers and items I have in the fridge and then try to compose a tasty dish (like Paleo Chopped with no time limits and no judges).

This was like a cold Thai Cucumber Salad, and it was freaking delicious!

cucumber noodles
scallions
sliced sausage (in this case it was grass-fed beef bratwurst)
fresh ginger
fresh garlic
serrano pepper
fresh cilantro
fresh basil
coconut aminos

I’m thrilled to announce that so far this year’s crop of serrano peppers are hot and spicy, unlike my first crop from last summer.

Filed under thai cucumber salad paleo caveman organic All Ingredients All Organic All the Time

6 notes

Anonymous asked: recipe for paleo mayo???

Ask, and ye shall receive. Enjoy the video.