Cooking Caveman with Jeff Nimoy

THESE ARE THE COOKING ADVENTURES OF JEFF NIMOY, AN LA WRITER WHO, WHILE DOING RESEARCH FOR A SCRIPT, STUMBLED UPON WHAT’S CALLED THE CAVEMAN DIET, ALSO KNOWN AS THE PALEO DIET. BASICALLY, IT’S EATING WHAT THE CAVEMEN ATE. HE TRIED IT OUT, AND THE RESULTS HAVE BEEN STAGGERING! THIS BLOG SHOWS EXACTLY HOW AND WHAT JEFF EATS. IF YOU’RE NEW TO THE BLOG, PLEASE START WITH THE “ENTERING THE CAVE” PAGE TO GET A CLEAR UNDERSTANDING OF WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT.

Posts tagged pasture raised

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I roasted a whole pasture-raised chicken last night. Rubbed with olive oil, rosemary from my garden, fresh thyme, garlic powder, onion powder, and black pepper. I also stuffed the cavity with mushrooms.
The fat dripped onto a bed of rutabaga, yellow onion, and garlic, with the same spice blend as the chicken.
Cook for 25 minutes per pound at 375 F degrees. Start with the breast side down so the back fat can drip into the drier white meat, then flip halfway through cooking, and finish breast side up. Stick a meat thermometer in the fleshy part of the thigh (don’t touch the bone), and when it hits 165 F, it’s done! Tent some aluminum foil over it while it rests outside the oven for about 10-15 minutes before carving.

I roasted a whole pasture-raised chicken last night. Rubbed with olive oil, rosemary from my garden, fresh thyme, garlic powder, onion powder, and black pepper. I also stuffed the cavity with mushrooms.

The fat dripped onto a bed of rutabaga, yellow onion, and garlic, with the same spice blend as the chicken.

Cook for 25 minutes per pound at 375 F degrees. Start with the breast side down so the back fat can drip into the drier white meat, then flip halfway through cooking, and finish breast side up. Stick a meat thermometer in the fleshy part of the thigh (don’t touch the bone), and when it hits 165 F, it’s done! Tent some aluminum foil over it while it rests outside the oven for about 10-15 minutes before carving.

Filed under roasted chicken pasture raised pasture-raised All Ingredients All Organic All the Time

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It’s Paleo Shake ‘N Bake, and I helped!

Older cave-holes like me will remember the commercial for Shake ‘N Bake that I’m referencing in the title of this post.  I used to love that sodium laced shit.  I’d beg my grandmother to use it on our Friday night chicken as an occasional switch from her regular chicken seasoning of garlic powder, salt, and paprika.  Every once in a while, maybe two or three times a year, she used it, and I was in heaven!  I don’t know why, but shaking food in a bag to coat it is fun!  When I got older and started cooking for myself, pork chops in Shake ‘N Bake was one of the few things I could cook.  That’s right folks, the ol’ Caveman wasn’t the gourmet he is today.  The need for cooking on paleo has turned me into a good cook.  Since the day I decided to go paleo, the biggest obstacle was overcoming my fear of the kitchen.  My knife skills still suck, but the food tastes gooooooood!!!!  So four years into my paleo journey, recreating Shake ‘N Bake is something that comes relatively easy for me.  Not as easy as using Shake ‘N Bake itself, but still pretty easy.

So here are the main ingredients for real Shake ‘N Bake for pork chops:

enriched wheat flour
salt
partially dehydrated soybean and cottonseed oil
sugar
(less than 2% of the following)
paprika
dextrose
dried onions
spice (whatever the hell that means)
caramel color (Mmm, yum, color!)
yeast
food coloring
natural flavoring

Read labels, folks.  According to the government, you can call practically anything “natural” simply because it exists in nature.  Natural flavoring is usually nothing more than chemicals, imported from New Jersey.  Dextrose, or anything -ose, is usually sugar.  So they use sugar, and sugar as two ingredients.  No sugar on the caveman diet, folks.  One of the worst things you can put in your body.  That includes the raw organic honey I use from time to time, as well as any other fake paleo sugar, like coconut sugar, agave, maple, etc.  It’s all just sugar, so stop looking for approval to use it in your meals from the paleo police.  If you want though, by all means, use it, just understand that it’s a cheat ingredient.

And if you want to know my thoughts on salt, just go to my page and search for salt (or click HERE, you lazy bastards).  I’m tired of talking about salt, so read about it yourself.  All I recommend is, if you DO eat salt, use an organic salt, like sea salt, that doesn’t require major chemicals in its production, like most conventional table salts.

As far as “coloring” goes, I just used spices that mimic the color of Shake ‘N Bake.

My paleo Shake ‘N Bake has the following ingredients (and they’re all organic, all the time):

almond flour (from sprouted almonds if possible)
arrowroot
paprika
sage
onion powder
black pepper
garlic powder
cayenne pepper
parsley
turmeric

And this is how it turned out:

image

Ugga-Bugga!  Served it with some lemon broccoli rice.  Delicious.  The cooking instructions remained the same as on the box:

"Directions: Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Moisten with water 6 to 8 (1/2-inch thick) bone-in or boneless pork chops.

1. Shake moistened chops, 1 to 2 at a time, in shaker bag with one packet of coating mix. Discard any remaining mix and bag.

2. Bake at 425 degrees F in ungreased or foil-lined 15 x 10 x 1-inch baking pan until cooked through.

1/2-inch thick bone-in or boneless: 15 minutes. Do not cover or turn pork during baking. Bake thicker chops 5 to 10 minutes longer.”

My pasture-raised boneless chops were thicker (like 1 inch!), so I baked them longer.  The trick is to not go so much by 50 year old cooking instructions on a box, but go by meat temperature.  The old days of pork cooked to 140 degrees or more are gone!  Cook them to 130 degrees and they’ll be juicy and tender.  It’s a trick my buddy Jonathan taught me, when I made a pork loin back in 2010.

My Paleo Shake ‘N Bake Pork Chops were so good, I had 2!!!!!  That’s a little more meat than I’m normally comfortable eating in one sitting, but I couldn’t stop myself.  I thought, “I’ll just have one bite of a second chop…” and before I knew it, GONE!  Maybe I’ll try this cooking method with chicken in the future, or just mix up the spice blend from time to time according to my mood.  Give it a try yourselves and let me know how it comes out!

Filed under paleo caveman caveman diet All Ingredients All Organic All the Time organic pork chops shake 'n bake paleo shake 'n bake ugga-bugga pasture raised pasture-raised pasture raised pork pasture-raised pork

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Anyone want some Turkey leftovers?  This gorgeous organic bird was naturally raised in a pasture, eating only what it found on the ground.  It took him a long time to mature, and then we ate the cave-shit out of him!
My cousin Melanie cooked the turkey, and I paleo’ized her favorite recipe. She normally coats the bird with soy sauce and then sprinkles on Lawry’s Seasoning Salt.  So instead, I gave her a bottle of organic coconut aminos to replace the soy sauce, and then made my own blend of Lawry’s using all organic ingredients:
sea saltgarlic powderonion powderpaprikaturmericcelery seedarrowroot
Lowry’s has corn starch, so that’s what the arrowroot was for, and it also has sugar, which I omitted completely.  If you smelled my blend next to the actual Lowry’s, mine actually smelled much better!
I’m using the carcass to make turkey ramen soup this weekend!  Ugga-Bugga!

Anyone want some Turkey leftovers?  This gorgeous organic bird was naturally raised in a pasture, eating only what it found on the ground.  It took him a long time to mature, and then we ate the cave-shit out of him!

My cousin Melanie cooked the turkey, and I paleo’ized her favorite recipe. She normally coats the bird with soy sauce and then sprinkles on Lawry’s Seasoning Salt.  So instead, I gave her a bottle of organic coconut aminos to replace the soy sauce, and then made my own blend of Lawry’s using all organic ingredients:

sea salt
garlic powder
onion powder
paprika
turmeric
celery seed
arrowroot

Lowry’s has corn starch, so that’s what the arrowroot was for, and it also has sugar, which I omitted completely.  If you smelled my blend next to the actual Lowry’s, mine actually smelled much better!

I’m using the carcass to make turkey ramen soup this weekend!  Ugga-Bugga!

Filed under turkey thanksgiving pasture raised pasture-raised paleo organic caveman crossfit

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Speak Up for Pastured Egg Farms

Now the FDA is trying to take away my number one source of protein: pasture-raised eggs from hens that only eat what they find on the ground.  Don’t let the government dictate what we can and can’t eat!  Especially when they’re taking away healthy organic food so that they can sell high profit unhealthy food.  Get involved!  This article provides a great form letter and link straight to the FDA to let them know how consumers feel.  Please check it out and speak your mind if this effects you!

Filed under pasture raised pasture raised eggs pasture-raised eggs pasture-raised fda

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Pork Chop!  I got some lovely pasture-raised pork chops from Lindy & Grundy, with fat so white a bride could wear it (if she doesn’t mind her dress rendering in the heat).
All Ingredients, All Organic, All the Time:
Pasture-raised bone-in pork chopolive oilgarlic powderonion powderblack pepperpaprikasagethymeoreganoAs pork chop comes to room temperature, coat with olive oil, and then sprinkle herbs on both sides, and the narrow fat side as well.
In a hot cast iron skillet, sear both sides (2-3 minutes each), and using tongs, sear the narrow fat side too.  Put pan into a pre-heated 350 degree oven for 2 minutes, flip, and then 2 more minutes.  Remove from the pan, and cover (or tent with foil) for 5-10 minutes.
The most tender pork chop I ever had!  Just a hint of pink is what you’re looking for, and that’s what I got!  It was so good, I gnawed on the bone like a real caveman until there was nothing left!  Ugga-Bugga!  I won’t be making this to eat on a date, that’s for sure.  Unless I’m dating a wolf.

Pork Chop!  I got some lovely pasture-raised pork chops from Lindy & Grundy, with fat so white a bride could wear it (if she doesn’t mind her dress rendering in the heat).

All Ingredients, All Organic, All the Time:

Pasture-raised bone-in pork chop
olive oil
garlic powder
onion powder
black pepper
paprika
sage
thyme
oregano

As pork chop comes to room temperature, coat with olive oil, and then sprinkle herbs on both sides, and the narrow fat side as well.

In a hot cast iron skillet, sear both sides (2-3 minutes each), and using tongs, sear the narrow fat side too.  Put pan into a pre-heated 350 degree oven for 2 minutes, flip, and then 2 more minutes.  Remove from the pan, and cover (or tent with foil) for 5-10 minutes.

The most tender pork chop I ever had!  Just a hint of pink is what you’re looking for, and that’s what I got!  It was so good, I gnawed on the bone like a real caveman until there was nothing left!  Ugga-Bugga!  I won’t be making this to eat on a date, that’s for sure.  Unless I’m dating a wolf.

Filed under pork chops pasture raised pasture-raised pasture raised pork pasture-raised pork cast iron skillet paleo caveman organic Lindy & Grundy crossfit All Ingredients All Organic All the Time ugga-bugga

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Another Happy Jew Year!

Staring tomorrow you’ll have to start writing 5774 on your checks!  Yes, it’s that time of year again, where I can just sit back and re-post old recipes.  But first, some fan mail to stroke my ego:

"Jeff,

I can’t thank you enough for posting your paleo tribe cuisine. Not only have I made your matzoh balls, but your brisket recipe (similar to my own Ashkenazi/ Americanized roots) was adaptable. THANK YOU a million times over. 
— 
Elise”
Thanks for your email Elise!  I actually just made a brisket the other day (I thought I was moving to NY for a long while and was trying to eat everything in my fridge and freezer, but I didn’t get the gig), and it was delicious, so instead, I made a roasted chicken, the second favorite meal behind brisket for Jews everywhere (actually I have no idea what Ethiopian Jews or Chinese Jews eat at Rosh Hashana, but if it’s not chicken or brisket, they really should get with the program).  Here’s a pic of the chicken I made last night (I knew I wouldn’t have time tonight, so it’s leftovers for my holiday meal):
 
A 3-pound pasture raised bird, coated with olive oil, fresh rosemary and thyme from my herb garden, and garlic and black pepper.  Roasted for 90 minutes at 385F degrees (start with breast side down, then flip halfway through).  Served it with mashed turnip.  Yum.
For the rest of you, here are two paleo brisket recipes, and my paleo matzoh ball soup recipe too.  Happy Jew Year!  Or as we say in Yiddish, “Ugga-Bugga!
September 17, 2012

Traditional Jewish Brisket - Paleo Style

I made this once before, but a sweeter version.  This recipe is the same as theLAST GRASS FED BRISKET RECIPE (click the link, or just see below), only I did not use mock grape jelly, just my caveman ketchup, and I also added some homemade bone broth to the casserole dish for moisture and au jus (jus for Jews).  A much more classic recipe for Jewish style brisket, only with a paleo flair.  For the veggies this time I only used onion, carrot, and rutabaga.  I made a 2 pound brisket, and I had to stop myself from eating it ALL last night!

Here’s what it looked like last night:

And here’s my original article from 2 years ago:

September 13, 2010

Happy Jew Year!

For those reading for the first time, let’s play a little catch up.  I catered a small gathering a few weeks ago, and my friend Wendy strongly urged me to make a caveman brisket for the Rosh Hashana holiday (brisket being the traditional meal), also known as the Jewish New Year.  But I was only going to do it if I didn’t get an invite to friends’ or family’s for the holiday meal.  Well, as the days approached, it looked like an invitation wasn’t coming (not surprising, I’m not very lovable, and probably talk with food in my mouth too much, spitting it across the room like a sprinkler head like my Grandmother used to), so I went to Whole Foods and bought a grass fed brisket.

But wouldn’t you know it, turns out I’m loved after all (aw shucks), especially by my friends Jessica & Pash.  They invited me over and the food was delicious!  Pash’s mom made these incredible side dishes and salad, which I will definitely feature in a future blog, and Jessica’s mom made an amazing brisket!  I picked her brain about how to cook it and turns out she mixed ketchup with apricots, along with spices and covered the brisket, cooking it over potatoes (yes, I cheated and had a potato, so sue me) for 3 hours.  It inspired me not to keep my grass fed brisket in the freezer until Passover, and make that sucker this weekend.

My sister gave me a recipe, but my friend Shari’s recipe intrigued me, because her sauce was a combo of ketchup and grape jelly!  That may sound like an odd combination to you, but a friend used to mix ketchup and grape jelly and bake chicken in it, calling it Hawaiian Chicken, and it was fabulous.  So I decided to make Shari’s recipe.

I also looked up a bunch of recipes on-line, and all the traditional Jewish recipes called for the same things, Lipton Onion Soup Mix, and Heinz Ketchup.  Shari’s and my sister’s recipes also called for these.  Okay, maybe our Jewish grandmothers weren’t the most creative cooks once they came to America, but in the age of “Mad Men,” it proves advertising worked on immigrants!  Obviously I can’t use Heinz ketchup, but if you’re a regular reader, you know I solved the ketchup problem early on in my caveman dieting.  I think my homemade caveman ketchup gets better every time I make it.  I substitute honey for sugar, and lemon juice for vinegar, and it tastes so thick and tomatoey (new word?), and FRESH!  I had a huge batch left over from my Labor Day weekend at the cabin, so that was one less thing I had to cook.

Then I looked up the ingredients in Lipton Onion Soup Mix: Dehydrated Onions, Salt, Cornstarch, Onion Powder, Sugar, Corn Syrup, Hydrolyzed Soy Protien, Caramel Color, Partially Hydrogentated Soybean Oil, Monosodium Glutamate, Yeast Extract, Natural Flavors, Disodium Inosinate, Disodium Guanylate.

Yummy!  I’ve been craving Disodium Guanylate since I went caveman!!!!  Just like Grandma used to make.  We’d come home from school, and there’d be a fresh batch of Disodium Guanylate waiting for us, right out of the oven!

We’ve all eaten so many chemicals for so long, and we don’t need to, folks.  The choice comes down to convenience over health.  I’m choosing health.  My buddy, who looks as healthy as a horse, just informed me he used to have Hodgkins Disease.  He was convinced it was from all the pesticides used in commercial farming, and he’s been eating organically (and has remained healthy) ever since.  I believe him.  Okay, enough preaching, let’s make this Lipton’s Chemical Soup Mix into a healthy alternative.

Organically speaking, there’s plenty of Dehydrated Onions and Onion Powder out there, so that was easy.  No corn starch, but I do have arrowroot, which is a thickener as well, and not made from grain like corn (no grains at all on the caveman diet).  Obviously no salt, one of the major no-no’s in Caveman Cooking, so I added some dry spices to make up for the taste lost due to the lack of salt:

Mock Lipton Soup Mix (all ingredients, all organic, all the time):
dehydrated onions
onion Powder
arrowroot
black pepper
garlic powder
thyme
sage

Forget the sugar, the sauce will be sweet enough.  All the other Lipton ingredients can be tossed out the window, I wouldn’t know what Hydrolyzed Soy Protein tastes like, let alone try to recreate it in a healthy way.  But my guess… tastes a little like chicken.

I didn’t bother looking up the ingredients in Welch’s grape jelly.  I have all the info I need in the name.  I had some fantastic organic California Red Seedless grapes, that I threw in the blender.  I added the ketchup (saving some for leftover brisket sandwiches later in the week), and blended them together with 2 cloves of garlic into a sauce.

Mock Grape Jelly:
red seedless grapes
caveman ketchup
2 cloves of garlic

Since I can’t use potatoes, I just cut up a bunch of root veggies into large chunks instead.

Carrots
celery
rutabaga
turnips
parsnip
celery root (something new to me)

Celery root is an ugly mother of a veggie, but once you peel away the outer skin, it tastes a little like a watery potato.  Not sure this is the best way to cook it yet, but still, mixed in with the others, it was delicious, and the potato wasn’t missed at all!!  The veggies had the same texture, taste, and feel of  potatoes, without all the bad things potatoes bring to your body, like toxins and saddle bags on your thighs.  Eat as many of these root veggies you like, you will not gain weight!  And if they’re organic, you will never get sick from them either.

Okay, I put my root veggies in a deep casserole dish, and drizzled some olive oil, giving them a toss, so they wouldn’t stick to the bottom or to each other.  I then layered some red onion slices on top.  Then I took out my grass fed brisket, and browned each side in a cast iron skillet.  Once it was browned, I rubbed the Caveman Onion Soup Mix into the warm brisket.  Then I laid it on the red onions and veggies, fat side down, poured the Caveman Ketchup/Grape Sauce over it, turned it over, and poured the rest on top of the fat side.  I like cooking things with the fat side up, so it drips down into the meat while it cooks.  Fat IS flavor!  Remember, not all fat is your enemy, and when it’s grass fed, or wild, the fat is rich with Omega-3, which is one of the healthiest things on earth.  It’s the fat from farm animals being fed corn and soy that makes them so unhealthy, so keep it organic and eat all the fat you want!

I covered it tight with aluminum foil and baked it at 350 degrees.  Supposedly it takes an hour a pound, but with all the questions I asked, and all the recipes I looked up, I couldn’t get a definitive time for cooking brisket.  So Shari helped me while I cooked it, telling me when to check it.  I figured since it was a relatively small brisket (after all, I’m only cooking for one), at 2.27 pounds, I could get away with 2 and a half hours of cooking time.  Shari told me to check on it at 2 hours, and stick a fork into the end. If the meat breaks away easily, it’s done.  If not, turn it over, cover it back up and keep cooking.  I stuck a fork into the end, and panicked because it didn’t fall away.  In fact, it seemed pretty tough.  Uh-oh, could be a disaster.  Another disaster for the Jews.  But maybe they’ll make a holiday out of it one day.  Pretty much every Jewish holiday is the same anyway, “They tried to kill us, they didn’t, let’s eat.”  In this case, “us” would be the brisket I was slowly killing at 350 degrees.  But back into the oven it went, praying for a miracle.

Left it in for another hour, and behold at the 3 hour mark, the tip fell off just like Shari said it would.  I guess no matter how big or small the brisket is, it still needs 3 hours to break down all the fat.  I let it settle for a few minutes, and it sliced just like it does on TV (or when a real cook makes it)!  The brisket was tender, juicy, and delicious!  It smelled amazing too!  The grass fed beef was definitely leaner than any other brisket I’ve ever had before, but it was still seasoned well, and juicy.  The sauce was amazing, maybe even too sweet for my taste, but still great.  Maybe next time I’ll use less grapes.  The veggies were outstanding, and made me think I can make mock mashed potatoes one day roasting a similar combo of root veggies.  The meat soaked up all the flavor from the red onion and the veggies, and the veggies sopped up the flavor from the meat, all complimented by the sauce.  Take a look for yourself:






Man, I feel so wonderfully Jewy right now!  Like Super Jew!  Able to leap tall cabinets in a single bound!  Able to balance a check book without a calculator!  Able to graduate medical school in only three years!  I made a brisket using no salt, using only organic ingredients, and all the fat was healthy!!  My grandmother would’ve had me committed if I told her that was possible 35 years ago.  Funny, the more technology we have, the more I want to resort back to the caveman days.  Next time you make a brisket, maybe give this a try and save your family’s health.  They can always add salt later from a shaker if they want, but at least it’ll be mostly healthy.  And delicious!!!  Maybe make it for Passover.  You might even hear from the open door, “Mmm, Elijah like Caveman Brisket!!  Ugga-Bugga!!!” (Sorry, a little inside Jewish humor for you gentiles).

April 17, 2011

It’s a Passover Miracle!

If you remember last September I tried to make Paleo Matzoh Ball Soup.  If you don’t remember, read this article you lazy bastards.  Okay, caught up now, are we?  So you know how I failed miserably.  But tomorrow night is Passover, the Matzoh Ball SuperBowl!  So I figured out what I did wrong last time and tried again.

When I first tasted my Paleo Almond Bread, to me it tasted a lot like a matzoh ball!  So I used the same recipe as my bread last time, but my mistake was, I tried cooking it like a matzoh ball… when I should have cooked it like bread!  Matzoh Balls are made by boiling them, but we all know bread is made by baking.  So I used the bread recipe again, and added about a 1/2 cup of water to the mix, and baked some Matzoh Ball Cupcakes:

Aren’t they cute?  Here they are out of the wrapper:

Okay, let’s add some soup and see what it looks like:

Now that’s what I call Matzoh Ball Soup!  Look at those bits of onion, turnip, parsnip, carrot, celery, parsley, and dill!  Okay, taste test.  We’ve got look, now we’re looking for texture and taste.  Be right back…

This is an overwhelming SUCCESS!!!  Except for the little crispy part on top, it really tastes and feels like a matzoh ball!!!!  It cuts perfectly with your spoon just like a matzoh ball too!  Eaten with a spoonful of broth, and it is the real deal!  A healthy matzoh ball soup, are you kidding me?  No salt, and no grains?  Good thing my grandmother is dead, this would kill her!

This is a major milestone for Jewish Cavemen everywhere.  Unfortunately, I might be the only Jewish Caveman anywhere.  Still, when I get my minions, and we hold our first seder dinner in The Caveman Cafe, we’ve got the soup covered!

Okay, so for the matzoh balls, just use the bread recipe, and add parsley, and if you like it like I like it, TONS of black pepper, along with garlic powder and onion powder.

1 cup of Almond Flour
1/3 cup of Arrowroot
3 TBL of Olive Oil
3 eggs
1/2 cup of water (in the future I skipped the water and used 1/4 tsp baking soda with 1/2 tsp lemon juice, came out much better, but slightly less paleo)
Parsley
Black Pepper
Onion Powder
Garlic Powder 

You’ll have to bake it longer since it’s a thick ball instead of a quick cooking thin sheet of bread.  I cooked mine for 30 minutes at 350.  Check the tops with a spoon, and if it feels spongy, it’s done.  If it cracks, and has liquid inside, it needs some more time.

And the soup recipe you know already, you lazy bastards (fine, click this link again).  And make sure it’s all organic, you hoodlums!  I see you out there in my yard, trudging your non-organic food all throughout my organic garden!  That’s it, I’m keeping your matzoh ball, my yard, my ball!  Now get the Ugga-Bugga out of here!

Happy Passover!

Filed under brisket grass fed beef grass fed brisket pasture raised pasture-raised chicken Matzoh Ball Rosh Hashana paleo caveman organic crossfit

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Paleo Re-Dedication Food Log: Saturday 8/3/13

Being the weekend, I indulged in breakfast.  3 Pasture-raised eggs with fresh basil from my garden.

Then I made some chicken salad from Friday’s leftover herb baked pasture-raised chicken breasts.  Picture doesn’t describe how good it was.

I went to the beach while the chicken salad flavors melded together, then came home and ate it with flax seed crackers.  Finished with some paleo Chocolate Paleo Ice Cream.

Oh, and there was organic decaf and water involved.

Paleo Chicken Salad (All Ingredients, All Organic, All the Time):

Pasture-raised chicken breast meat
Homemade Mayo
Shredded Carrot
Shredded Celery 
Shredded Red Onion
Blueberries or Champagne Grapes
Thyme
Rosemary
Sage
Dill
Garlic Powder
Assorted Spicy Peppers
Black Pepper

Filed under Paleo Chicken Salad All Ingredients All Organic All the Time pasture raised pasture-raised paleo caveman crossfit organic

7 notes

Paleo Re-Dedication Food Log: Friday 8/2/13:
I made simple baked chicken breasts (skinless, boneless, and pasture-raised), with all fresh herbs from my herb garden!  Love having fresh herbs anytime I want them (without the pressure of using them up before they rot).  I used sage, rosemary, and thyme from my garden, and added olive oil, garlic and black pepper (all ingredients, all organic, all the time).  I also roasted broccoli and carrots in the same bake pan.
All the leftover chicken will be turned into chicken salad today.  I’ve been craving it all summer long, and I’m finally getting off my cave-ass to make it.
Just water all day, along with two cups of decaf (at this point, let’s just consider organic decaf coffee a part of my diet, making me less than a perfect caveman, but I’m okay with that… for now).
Then this meal.  I only ate one chicken breast, but I ate a ton of the side vegetables, so I was plenty full when I quit eating.  Even so, I saved room for paleo ice cream (almond butter chocolate chip!).  And yes, another cup of decaf to end my eating for the day.
All in all, I’m pretty happy with my week of paleo eating.

Paleo Re-Dedication Food Log: Friday 8/2/13:

I made simple baked chicken breasts (skinless, boneless, and pasture-raised), with all fresh herbs from my herb garden!  Love having fresh herbs anytime I want them (without the pressure of using them up before they rot).  I used sage, rosemary, and thyme from my garden, and added olive oil, garlic and black pepper (all ingredients, all organic, all the time).  I also roasted broccoli and carrots in the same bake pan.

All the leftover chicken will be turned into chicken salad today.  I’ve been craving it all summer long, and I’m finally getting off my cave-ass to make it.

Just water all day, along with two cups of decaf (at this point, let’s just consider organic decaf coffee a part of my diet, making me less than a perfect caveman, but I’m okay with that… for now).

Then this meal.  I only ate one chicken breast, but I ate a ton of the side vegetables, so I was plenty full when I quit eating.  Even so, I saved room for paleo ice cream (almond butter chocolate chip!).  And yes, another cup of decaf to end my eating for the day.

All in all, I’m pretty happy with my week of paleo eating.

Filed under All Ingredients All Organic All the Time pasture raised pasture-raised baked chicken Carrots broccoli organic paleo caveman crossfit

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Paleo Re-Dedication Food Log: Sunday 7/21/13

Got up early to go to the farmers market where I got about two weeks worth of food (especially with Intermittent Fasting).

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Plums, white nectarines, grapes, heirloom tomato (for salsa), plum tomatoes (for marinara sauce and salads), broccoli, cucumber, avocado, and eggplant.  Not pictured is romaine lettuce, kale, red onion, and cilantro.  All for about $30.  Eating organic doesn’t have to be expensive.

For breakfast I had 3 pasture-raised eggs scrambled with black pepper, scallions, and jalapeño.  I like them a little loose and wet.

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I also had a bunch of paleo mochas (decaf coffee, cacao powder, honey, and coconut oil).  Played softball and afterwards had a grass-fed hot dog with mustard and a few forkfuls of sauerkraut (they all had sea salt in them, but they were all organic).  I guess you can call that lunch. I just like a little protein before and after playing sports.

Dinner was the last of the breaded chicken cutlets (I never did get to make that chicken salad), with a quick marinara sauce, and carrot spaghetti.

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And for dessert, some soft serve paleo chocolate “ice cream.”  Two ingredients: frozen organic banana, and raw organic cacao powder.

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I can’t believe people think my diet is so limited.  Dieting does NOT mean deprivation!

Back to IF this week, and tonight, the meal that made people scream to me when I posted it on Facebook back in August of 2010, “You’ve GOT to start a blog about what you eat!!!!”  Tune in tomorrow to find out what it is!  Ugga-Bugga!

Filed under ugga-bugga Dieting Does Not Mean Deprivation All Ingredients All Organic All the Time organic paleo caveman crossfit chocolate chocolate ice cream paleo ice cream carrot carrot pasta marinara italian food pasture raised pasture raised eggs pasture-raised farmers market chicken cutlet

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Paleo Re-Dedication Food Log: Friday 7/19/13

Water and Green Tea throughout the day.  For dinner (around 6:30) I put together a big salad featuring the chicken breasts from yesterday.  Other ingredients were romaine lettuce, tomato, red onion, broccoli, pumpkin seeds. 

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Then added a creamy Italian dressing made of homemade mayo, and dry spices like black pepper, onion powder, garlic powder, basil, thyme, oregano, and a touch of lemon juice to brighten it all up.  And of course, it was all organic (and delicious).

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I was still hungry (being my only meal of the day), so I made a small sandwich from one of the smaller breasts left over.  Simple, two thin slices of almond butter bread, slathered in mayo, and doused with black pepper, and a thin slice of red onion.  This is a paleo version of the sandwich my father used to make for me when we snuck out of temple on Yom Kippur and ate in secret while everyone else was praying and fasting.  I know, we were bad Jews.  But we ate well.

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For dessert I had 2 glorious dark plums, and a cup of paleo-ish mocha (decaf coffee, small tsp of raw cacao powder, and a spoonful of coconut oil).

Tonight will be another sandwich (a more substantial one than this small version), and tomorrow will be either one last big salad using the same ingredients, or Chicken Pizzaiola with carrot spaghetti, and a side salad.

Filed under chicken pasture raised pasture-raised salad mayo Mayonaise creamy italian dressing chicken sandwich almond butter bread intermittent fasting paleo organic All Ingredients All Organic All the Time caveman crossfit

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Paleo Re-Dedication Food Log: Thursday 7/18/13

Water and Green Tea throughout the day.  First and only meal of the day came around 6:00pm.  Southern Fried Chicken Breasts (skinless, boneless, and pasture-raised, coated in almond flour, coconut flour, and spices,  and fried in pasture-raised lard), served with broccoli (sautéed in the same skillet as the chicken).  And accompanied by this summer’s first batch of my Plum Loco Sauce, the sauce that is by far the best thing I’ve ever made or tasted!

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I had 1 large and 1 small breast, and most of the head of broccoli I made, plus a large plum for dessert (again with the plums?  Who is this guy, Violet from Willy Wonka?).  I also had an after-dinner cup of decaf with a small amount of raw honey, and a spoonful of coconut oil (all ingredients, all organic, all the time).  I don’t really consider coffee paleo, but what the hell, I’m an addict, and it’s better than heroin.

I’m thinking chicken caesar salad tonight with the leftovers.  Ugga-Bugga!

Filed under ugga-bugga All Ingredients All Organic All the Time pasture raised pasture-raised chicken broccoli plum loco plum loco sauce plum sauce Almond Flour coconut flour

17 notes

Paleo Re-Dedication Food Log: Wednesday 7/17/13

Woke up and had a tall glass of water.  Then, I take one tea bag of organic green tea, and just keep drinking and re-filling my cup all day long.  Intermittent Fasting until I started dinner at 4:00pm.  I needed to eat early, because I had to leave for a meeting around 6:30, and besides I was starving.

Around 4:30 I had 3 grilled organic hot Italian sausages from Lindy & Grundy, made from pasture raised pork, served with a bed of sautéed kale in olive oil, with onions, garlic, and fresh basil from my herb garden (all ingredients, all organic, all the time).  I’ve had these sausages before, and they’re way too salty for me, but it’s got to get used up, and since I’m coming off about two weeks of non-paleo, I figured this is a good time to eat it, since my palate and tastebuds are probably shot.  Even so, it was still way too slaty for me, and I won’t be buying these again.  Maybe they’ll make me some without salt if I ask nicely.  ”Pretty please… with Ugga-Bugga on top?”

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For dessert, I had three tiny apricots and one tiny plum.  I was really full, which is what I wanted, since I knew I wouldn’t be eating again for at least 24 hours.

More Intermittent Fasting today (and for the foreseeable future).  I’ve got 6 great pasture raised boneless skinless chicken breasts, also from L&G, and I think I’m going to fry them, coated in almond flour, and then use them for different meals all week.  Maybe I’ll bake two of them without the almond flour (I finish the frying in the oven anyway), so I can enjoy some chicken salad which I’ve been craving lately.

Filed under ugga-bugga All Ingredients All Organic All the Time pasture raised pasture-raised chicken hot italian sausage Lindy & Grundy kale onions garlic olive oil paleo organic caveman crossfit intermittent fasting